David B. Coe: Point of View, Voice, and the Choices We Make

DavidBCoeDavidBCoe

I’m sure that some of you saw the title of this post and groaned. I have written about point of view on this site quite a bit. I talk about point of view on panels and in writing workshops all the time. I have said again and again that, to my mind, point of view is the single most important narrative tool we have at our disposal, because it brings together character development AND plot AND setting. How does it do this? By coloring all that our readers experience with the emotions, thoughts, perceptions, and knowledge of our point of view characters. You’ve heard all of this before, and many of you are probably sick to death of it. Sorry. But it really is important . . .

I’m not going to give you the whole “Here’s why I care so much about point of view” thing today. I’m […]

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Things You Didn’t Know About The Wild West

Misty MasseyMisty Massey

One week in, and the Weird Wild West Kickstarter is not only 22% funded, but was named a Staff Pick on the very first day! It’s going to be a great book – we have amazing writers lined up to craft stories for you – and if we can manage to fund for the second volume, we’ll have more stories by even more great writers!

Today I thought I’d entertain you with some interesting bits of information about the Wild West. This might be your chance to win at Jeopardy! Or even more likely, one of the following wacky facts might spark your ideas enough to get a story started. Did I mention that there’ll be open submission slots in The Weird Wild West if we fund successfully? There will be, so share the link with your friends!

 

Whiskey had a number of names during the days of the […]

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David B. Coe: Openings, Hooks, and Breaking Rules

DavidBCoeDavidBCoe

Last week I re-introduced you to my upcoming novel, Spell Blind, which is the reincarnation of a book I wrote a long time ago, and the culmination of years of writing, reinvention, and revision. I have always loved the characters, but it wasn’t until I came up with a new plot and, more importantly, a new magic system that the novel and its sequels became all that I wanted them to be.

What I love most about all the books in the Case Files of Justis Fearsson are the characters and their interactions. And I intend to write a couple of posts about them (Spell Blind comes out January 6, so I’m going to be showing up here at Magical Words throughout December and January; we have plenty of time to cover a bunch of topics) and about other elements of the story as well. But today I want to […]

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Lisa Mantchev: On Character

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My background is in theater, so when I start a new writing project, it’s like casting a play. I settle down in an auditorium chair, clipboard in hand. Characters turn up for the audition, read a few lines, and get assigned roles and relationships. Divas and ingénues and leading men and stagehands and technicians mill around my mental space which, at the beginning, looks like that empty stage with a ladder and a bare light bulb on a stand.

The tricky bit is the fact that I don’t have a script for them. Not just yet anyway. So I follow them to the Green Room, eavesdropping on their conversations and thoughts. Of course all of them want to be the star. They all want their name in lights. They want… oh, they want. And they must want whatever it so much that they might just push the leading lady down […]

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David B. Coe: My New Old Book

DavidBCoeDavidBCoe

Hello again, Magical Words! Great to be back here as I begin the publicity ramp-up to another book release.

The new book is called Spell Blind, and it’s the first book in a new contemporary urban fantasy series, the Case Files of Justis Fearsson, that I’m writing for Baen Books. The hardcover of Spell Blind drops on January 6, 2015. The second book in the series, His Father’s Eyes, will be out this summer.

This is actually a series that I’ve discussed here on MW in the past. The first book, in a substantially different form, sold initially to Meisha Merlin back in 2005. Not long after, Meisha Merlin went out of business, and I was fortunate enough to get back the rights to the books before they became entangled in the company’s Chapter Eleven negotiations. But when Lucienne and I put the books back on the market we couldn’t […]

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Home From Atomacon

Misty MasseyMisty Massey

I was fortunate enough to be a guest at Atomacon last weekend in Charleston SC. It was the second year for this con, and I was happy to see that attendance increased by a noticeable margin. (It would be way cool to see some of you guys there next year!)

I appeared on several panels, one of which was “Ten Things That Will Make An Editor Stop Reading”. It was based on things we covered during the Live Action Slush panels at ConCarolinas (for those of you who weren’t there, we asked people to submit the first page of their work without their names attached. David, Faith and I listened while one of our intrepid readers read the work aloud. As we heard something that would make us stop reading, we raised our hands. Once all three hands were raised, we stopped the reading and discussed what we felt needed […]

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On working with others

Carrie RyanCarrie Ryan

Often people will find out I’ve co-written a novel with my husband and they’ll say, “I could *never* do that — we’d kill each other!” And to be honest, even when JP and I started writing The Map to Everywhere, we weren’t sure how well it would work. We’re both stubborn and opinionated and I don’t think it would have surprised either of us if we’d had to scrap the project (we’d already agreed that our marriage came first).

Happily, we found that we compliment each other in the best of ways and writing Map together was a fantastic experience! But there were a few things we had to learn (or re-learn) along the way. First, we had to both be willing to let go — this project didn’t belong to either of us more than the other. We were both invested, we both brought a lot to the table, […]

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