How To Get Real Magical Powers

Misty MasseyMisty Massey
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Click Here ——> Want real magical powers?

I’m sure you’ve noticed that when you type a phrase into Google, some of the hits seem to have nothing to do with your original thought. My husband came in last night to tell me that lately one of the search phrases that had brought folks to visit us here was “how to get real magical powers to do whatever we want.” They’re hoping we’ll say that if they burn a little incense and chant the right words, they will achieve their dreams with a minimum of effort. Wouldn’t that be nice? It’s probably why we all write what we do, to make the magic real in the only way we can. The profession of writing looks a little like magic, I suppose. It’s done in seclusion, by people whose faces aren’t on magazine covers every week. The books appear out of thin air on bookstore shelves, and transport readers to wonderlands. And those ideas…that must be magic, for someone to come up with such outlandish thoughts.

I’ve met a number of people over the last ten years who, upon finding out that I was a writer with a goal of publication, would immediately regale me with details about the book they were hoping to write. Not a word was on paper yet, but they were planning on getting started soon. Some of them were waiting for spare time to present itself (like that ever happens!), for someone to come along and do the writing while they shared their ideas (you have to be kidding), or for a publisher to offer them a contract before they bothered starting (honestly, someone said this to me not long ago.) They’re sure that selling a book to a publisher automatically makes the writer richer than Croesus. They want to believe writing is easy.

I’ve also met people who hope to be published. Instead of telling me what they will do someday, they tell me about the 200+ pages they’ve already written, about the worlds they’ve built, the characters who’ve come alive in their imaginations. They know that writing isn’t about the money, and that it isn’t the profession that will save them from their 9-to-5. They know from experience that it’s not easy. But they do it anyway. These are the ones who’ve found the arcane secret of writing – that it isn’t worth doing unless you love it. That is the real magic.

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12 comments to How To Get Real Magical Powers

  • I knew a woman who was bothered by the fact that the 250 words per page rule of thumb was not actually *accurate*, and that a (for example) 400 page manuscript was not actually exactly 100,000 words. She went to some trouble to create an algebraic equation that explained the discrepancy.

    She /did/ write, that particular person, but I have to admit the first thing I thought when I heard about the equation is “this person is never going to get published.”

  • She hasn’t found the magic of it all, clearly.

    I met a woman once who said she wanted to be published but was terrified of some agent or editor stealing her work. She sent off a submission packet, which was supposed to consist of the first three chapters and a cover letter, but she sent in thirty random, nonconsecutive pages instead.

    Way to shoot yourself in the foot. ;)

  • *giggles*
    Nice post, Misty. Now I must get back to work writing.
    *waves magic wand*
    Faith

  • I have actually had someone suggest to me that I write his book for him. This person even offered to share the money he made, which he apparently felt was the least he could do. I’m pretty sure he was right….

    I told him that I had enough ideas of my own to keep me busy for quite some time, and that perhaps he would do better to write his own book himself. I think he took this for rudeness, because that pretty much killed the conversation.

  • David! Shame on you! *more giggles*
    A former step brother offered me the same deal.
    Must admit that I wasn’t hurt when he got miffed.

    It goes back to the non-writer POV. They think it’s *easy* for us! Yeah, right. Easy…
    Faith

  • Robin Weeks

    Well, you can’t blame us for wishing it was easy, can you? :)

    I’ve written enough of my own very pre-publication book to have moved past, well, all of the above laughable theories about how easy it is (yeah, except for wanting someone to write it for me–where’s the fun in that?), but not enough to clue into the “won’t make me instantly rich” idea. I’m fighting that one. It can’t be true! :)

    Wanted to let you all know that I love your books–I followed a link to this site and had to read everything. I’m almost done (except for David’s–you’re next) and I’m in awe. Do write more. I love your characters, your writing, and this site. Such a nice thing to do, to help out struggling writer-wanna-be’s! Thanks!

  • Thank you, Robin! What a lovely compliment!

    No, we don’t blame you at all for wishing it was easy, because we still do, ourselves. There are nights I’m growling at the computer screen because I don’t know what comes next, and I’m ready to throw things. :D

    Hey David, I wonder if that’s a rite of passage for writers, to have someone offer us the opportunity to write their book for them. It seems to happen far too often…

    Magic wand, Faith? I’m a potions girl, me. Mix a little rum with whatever’s on hand, and look at me go! *laughs*

  • Great post. Everything makes sense now. Writers=magicians. LOL!

  • People talk about “wanting to write a book” because It sounds prestigious, smart, and accomplished. Unfortunately, in reality, writing is tedious, emotionally taxing, and tiring. Yet, I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

  • Thanks.

    It reminded me Stephen Pressfield’ s book
    “War of Art” — must read books for every
    writer, I think.

    He wrote very similar words.

  • It is indeed magic. I find myself agonizing for hours, days, weeks, even months until the dam breaks, and lo! there springs forth from my pen a book (or an article, or whatever), fully formed as from the head of Zeus.

    What I have since learned is this: once I have the topic and make a rough plan, I consciously leave it (worrying all the time about the deadline) while my active little brain continues processing it in the background. Once I’ve panicked long enough, the processing stops and the end result begins to spew out. It’s hell on my stress level, but makes for great continuity! :)

    I wish there were a different, more leisurely path for me to the finished product, but alas, it seems that this is the method with which I am stuck — it worked in high school (I always got “A”s on the panic papers, and “C”s on the ones I tried to do slowly), it worked in college, it works as a professional.

    Blarg.

    Magic, of a dark and sinister — and oh, so fun! — kind.

  • Andy Swindler

    It’s funny how easy some things look before you try them. Golf, writing, playing the piano. Having dabbled here and there while torturing myself waiting for that inspired moment of creative free time, I tried out NaNoWriMo a couple years ago. 50,000 words in the month of November to get those creative juices flowing. And then you realize how much work editing really is…