Making Money Mondays — Patron and Kickstarter

The Patron and Kickstarter method of funding life and projects.

More and more we are seeing writers and others in arts and science go to the public for assistance for everything from funding a film, to producing an anthology, to creating a comic book, to producing a new battery to run cars, to making a watch, which surely must contain a genie who has magical flatulence to support the cost required by the startup money needed. Some projects are so successful that they fund hundreds to millions of dollars over the startup capital needed to produce the … whatever it is.

I’ve used this method myself, using Kickstarter to fund the Rogue Mage Role Playing Game. We were successful. We finished the project. It was grueling and I’ll never do it again because it was the “Project from Hell,” which I’ve written about here and won’t bore you with it […]

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The Inciting Event

Before I even start, go ahead and google the phrase Inciting Event.

Don’t bother to read them all. Half make no sense. But I did like one by Lucy Gold at Answers.com. According to Lucy, an Inciting Event is, “The conflict that begins the action of the story and causes the protagonist to act. Without this event, there would be no story.” She has edited the original with a more wordy and writerly addition, but really, it was unnecessary. This says it all, and it’s pretty much how I explain and use the concept.

Understanding the theory of the Inciting Event, and its placement, and executing it well, are, together, the most important things in grabbing readers for your story: novel, short, novella, novelette, or even an epic series of a million words. “Wait!”, you say. “George R.R. Martin’s sixth novel in the Game of Thrones had color pictures and […]

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When Life Gets In The Way – And It Will

We are writers. No matter what we write, we are writing about life, about living, about the things that matter to us, about the pain and joy and music and poetry of living. We are writing about the insecurity and excitement of romance, a mystery that needs to be solved, a life decision that needs to be made, a loss that has been suffered, a battle or war that needs to be fought.

We write, and as we write, we incorporate and use every good and wonderful and easy thing that has happened to us, as well as every difficult and painful and dreadful thing that has happened to us in the past. All that we are, all that we have survived, is part of our characters and our plotlines and the landscapes of our writing. The feel of water from a cold shower can be interpreted and twisted into […]

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A Small Press Talk

In General:

On paper, the money from a small press looks just as good as the money as from a bigger press. Better even. Percentages on ebooks from big houses usually runs 25% of net. In small houses, it’s usually 50% of net. Paper copies at big houses will start your payment 8% on mass market and start at 10% of hardback cover price. Small presses (almost) universally use POD (print on demand) for books and the percentage usually starts at 10%, so no loss or gain on percentage there.

Most larger presses are beginning to ease away from printing mass market books. The MMs never made any money for the companies. Trade paperbacks have meant higher profit margins meaning more money in their pockets. Ebooks ensure fewer returns. POD trade paperbacks can be issued per order, so no losses on returns there either. Therefore, all these changes in formats […]

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The Beginning of the END part Four — More on the Small Press

Morning, y’all!

I ended two weeks ago with a bit of the pros and cons when dealing with small presses, over big presses, and there were just as many cons as pros when it came to dealing with and being published by New York houses. I’d like to concentrate on one single pro today, and how it may often be better than dealing with big houses and with self-publishing.

(With apologies to Di, and her post on Friday!)

Pros for working with a small press? In my opinion is this – Writers get a bigger percentages on electronic sales. NYC offers a standard 25%. Most small presses offer 50% net. And the money flows to the author. A lot of people are going the self-pub route, because they think they can make a high percentage with the first check, and they are right on a sale-by-sale percentage. But that isn’t […]

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The Beginning of the End Part 3 — The Small Press

Happy Day-After-Valentine’s Day, Y’all! Picking up where we left off, let’s talk about small presses. (I know it isn’t a rose or candy, but it’s good info.)

With stores ordering fewer and fewer books, publishing houses publishing fewer and fewer books, and more and more readers ordering electronic books (the book purchasing percentages of the Jane Yellowrock series are now 81% electronic) we have more and more writers, even high midlist name writers, looking at small presses. Herewith are a few of the Pros (prose?) and Cons of the SMALL PRESS.

Cons 1. No books on bookstore shelves 2. Poor likelihood of library purchases 3. Poor likelihood that the small press will work with distributors like Baker & Taylor and Ingram’s 4. Which makes it difficult for indie bookstores and chains to even know about your book 5. Few small presses even put out an electronic catalogue 6. Small presses […]

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The Beginning of The End, Part 2

Last month, I talked a bit about the changes present and coming to the publishing industry: the way that mass market paperbacks (the small paperbacks) are slipping away; the way that publishing houses are moving to Trade (the large paperbacks), Hard cover, and E-books; the way that bookstores are going to buy and stock fewer books altogether. A LOT less books; the way that the decreasing amount of shelf space for new books in stores will change the publishing marketplace. Worse – the way that, with fewer large pubs, there will be fewer numbers of writers published. Worst — the way that those fewer numbers of books in houses and on bookshelves means fewer editorial staff kept on hand, fewer PR staff, and all this means more adjustments for unpublished and midlist writers.

These changes have already resulted in a huge transformation in the way readers shop for books, and […]

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