Joshua Palmatier — My Crazy Writer’s Life

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ShatteringtheLeyCoverSHATTERING THE LEY

This is my last guest post here at Magical Words for my new novel SHATTERING THE LEY (in stores now).  Again, thanks for having me.  It’s been great fun posting here and I hope the readers have had a blast as well.

In this last post, I figured I’d talk about my crazy writer’s life, because it is indeed crazy.  You see, I have a day job, because the writing doesn’t yet pay the bills on a regular basis.  So the day job teaching mathematics at SUNY Oneonta in upstate New York is a necessity.  It’s a great job and I really do enjoy teaching (yes, even math), and I’ve recently received tenure, so it’s now a secure job, which is getting harder and harder to find.  But like any job, it does suck up a lot of time where I could be writing instead.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t write.  There’s always time, you just have to carve it out of your schedule and then make certain you actually WRITE during those few hours you can grab.  This past year, I’ve been working on the sequel to SHATTERING THE LEY, called THREADING THE NEEDLE.  In order to get my writing time in, I organized my teaching schedule so that I’d have at least an hour of writing time each morning, before heading off to teach.  (This is opposite my usual schedule—I typically write in the afternoon—but the teaching schedule demanded it.)  So, each morning I’d get up, get around, and then sit myself down in the chair and write.  One hour.  Every chance I got.  Normally I try to get 750 words in that one hour, but for this book I tried to push myself up to 1000 words.  Sometimes I made it, most often I got between 750 and 1000, a few days, I’d drag out only 500 words.  But I was writing.

Now, of course, it’s the summer break, which is one of the main reasons I wanted to teach.  I knew I’d have a good chunk of time to work on writing during the summer.  So I’m trying to get at least 2000 words a day now.  Why not more?  Well, if I can get more, then of course I go for it.  But even without the day job, there are writing-related things that I have to attend to, such as promotion.  This includes things like writing these guest blogs, answering interview questions for various places, setting up and organizing signings and conventions and appearances, etc.  In addition, I’m usually working on more than one project at a time.  I write short stories on occasion, and those usually take up a good week of writing.  But I also edit anthologies, and in fact last summer, created a new small press called Zombies Need Brains.  The first anthology, CLOCKWORK UNIVERSE: STEAMPUNK vs ALIENS, should be releasing soon (if it hasn’t hit the shelves already) and we’re working on the next anthology TEMPORALLY OUT OF ORDER.  All of these writing-related things take up some time as well.

So, overall, I’m rather busy.  But I wouldn’t have it any other way.  That’s my crazy writer’s life.  And now it’s time to get back to the real work—the writing and production of new things.  Thanks for hanging out with me the last four weeks and reading these posts.  If you haven’t already, check out SHATTERING THE LEY.  And if you’ve got the time, CLOCKWORK UNIVERSE and TEMPORALLY OUT OF ORDER as well.  And keep watch for new and exciting things from me and Zombies Need Brains in the near future!

BenTateAuthor Bio:  Joshua Palmatier is a fantasy writer with a PhD in mathematics.  His upcoming novel SHATTERING THE LEY (July 2014, DAW) is the first book in a new series, set in the same world as his “Throne of Amenkor” series.  He is also the founder of the new small press Zombies Need Brains LLC, which will focus on producing quality science-fiction and fantasy themed anthologies.  It’s first anthology release will be CLOCKWORK UNIVERSE: STEAMPUNK vs ALIENS, currently in the production phase, to be released sometime before July 2014.  Joshua has also published numerous short stories in various anthology.  Find out more at www.joshuapalmatier.com and www.benjamintate.com.

Social Media Info:
Joshua Palmatier:  www.joshuapalmatier.com
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/joshuabpalmatier
Twitter:  @bentateauthor
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Jennifer Estep — Plotting While Wearing Pants

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Poison PromiseOh, plotting. You and I aren’t the best of friends. More like casual acquaintances, if that.

When many folks talk about writing, they often talk about two kinds of writers—plotters and pansters. Now, plotters are just what the name implies. These are the folks who plot out their books, which can include everything from doing a chapter-by-chapter breakdown of the book to detailed character outlines to creating storyboards of the various scenes/chapters.

And then there are pansters, or people who don’t do a lot of plotting. I am one of those folks.

Usually, when I’m thinking about an idea for a book, I’ll think about my heroine first—her personality, her strengths and weaknesses, her magic and how she can use it to defeat the bad guys. Then, I’ll think about the three big turning points of the story:

1) The first chapter that opens the book. I often think of these like those opening teasers in a James Bond movie—almost like a small, self-contained story with some action to grab people’s interest but that also ties in to the overall plot.

2) The event—a magical attack, a kidnapping, a robbery, etc.—that happens in the beginning of the Black Widowbook that drives my heroine’s actions through the middle of the book.

3) And finally, the big battle with the villain at the end of the story.

And that’s about as much as I ever plot out a book. Once I have my heroine and all these turning points in mind, I sit down, start writing, and see where the story and characters take me.

Sometimes, I have a good grasp of the overall plot and many of the specific scenes, and the story come very easily to me. Other times, I’ll get halfway through writing a book and realize that I should have zigged when I zagged. When that happens, I spend a lot of time rewriting in my second draft.

Most of the time, it falls somewhere in the middle. I know some of the scenes, but as I’m writing, the characters or story take me in an unexpected direction. Sometimes, that’s a good thing, and sometimes, it’s not.

Killer FrostNow, you may be asking why I don’t plot out a book. Surely, that would be easier and save me some time, right? Maybe. But I find that if I plot out the book beforehand, then I feel like I’ve sort of written the book already, and I’m just not as engaged with the characters and story as I am if I don’t plot everything out.

But this is just the method that works for me. One of the trickiest things about being a writer is finding the method that works for you—because no one else can do that for you. Just like no one else can write your book but you.

So whether you are a plotter or a panster or fall somewhere in between, I wish you good luck in all your writing endeavors. Happy writing and reading!

What about you guys? Are you plotters or pansters? How much planning do you do before you start writing a book?

JENNIFER’S SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:
Website: http://www.jenniferestep.com/
Blog: http://www.jenniferestep.com/blog/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/JenniferEstepAuthor?fref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Jennifer_Estep  (@Jennifer_Estep)
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/580315.Jennifer_Estep

JENNIFER’S BIO:

Jennifer Estep is a New York Times bestselling author, prowling the streets of her imagination in search of her next fantasy idea. Jennifer writes the Elemental Assassin urban fantasy series for Pocket Books. She is also the author of the Mythos Academy young adult urban fantasy series for Kensington and the Bigtime paranormal romance series.

Poison Promise, the 11th book in the Elemental Assassin series, will be published on July 22. Black Widow, the 12th book, will be released on Nov. 25.

 

For more on Jennifer and her books, visit her website at www.jenniferestep.com. You can also follow Jennifer on Facebook, Goodreads, and Twitter – @Jennifer_Estep.

Commiting Series: Saying Goodbye

Catie MurphyCatie Murphy

SHAMAN RISES by CE Murphy So you’ve written a million or so words in lead-up and now you’re at the end of the series. The last book. The grand finale. You’ve spent hundreds, even thousands, of hours with these characters, plotting and twisting your way through their lives.

How the heck do you say goodbye?

More than that, even: how do you make it worthy? How do you pay off a million words of build-up, a decade of putting stories out there and (hopefully!) having people ask for more? How do you create something *satisfying* at the end of all that, something that will leave you, your characters and your readers all saying, “Yeah. Yeah, that was how it should have ended. That was right.”?

My God, it’s not easy.

For me…for me it’s generally about balance, and with the Walker Papers and Joanne, who began the story badly unbalanced, it’s *particularly* about balance. Nothing can come too easily; that’s cheating. But neither should the payments come out of nowhere: there needs to be story backing it up, not just in the final book but ideally all the way back to the beginning. Which means either you have to know at the start what you’re doing, or you have to be able to look back and recognize where you laid the plot threads to pull it together at the end.

I fell more into the second category, although somewhere around book 3 my editor made a comment that laid a major character’s pathway out for me clearly, and so I knew from that point on where that character’s story would end, which left some obvious implications. (I’m talking around it, I know; maybe I’ll give details in comments if people want me to. :))

I also knew from early on that the lesson learned in one of the very first books was going to have resounding effects at the end of the series. Even so, I blew it on the first draft.

I really did. I knew when I turned it in to my editor that it didn’t sing, and I sort of knew why. There was something that I felt *had* to happen with Joanne, but I couldn’t see how to do it without losing all sympathy for the character–the only way I could see to write it was to have her do something not only unforgiveable from a reader POV, but honestly, unforgiveable from her own. She would rather have died, which would have been a rather abrupt ending to the series.

I spent a long time talking it over with my editor. A lot of emails, and some Skype sessions, and I explained the Unforgiveable Thing and how I didn’t see how to accomplish the end game without it but I couldn’t write the book *with* it–and as often happens when I’m talking out plot problems, I started talking over myself until I had delivered unto my editor several pages of what she essentially saw as gibberish but which ended with me saying “Okay, this’ll work,” and her saying “Good, good, go forth, fix it,” in magnanimous I knew I could solve it all for you tones. :)

I got past the Unforgiveable Thing in a way that made it work so it was no longer Unforgiveable (although there are readers who will disagree with me :)), and it balanced. It had the weight I needed it to have, the price I was looking for, and it resonated all the way back to the beginning of the series. and I was left with…

…honestly, I was left with a thing I couldn’t live with. It had been a necessary part of the story, and I didn’t want to pull a cheat, but I also couldn’t bear it. It was too awful, it hurt me too much, and…and I realized I had left myself the slimmest thread to reel it back from the edge with. And I also realized that pulling it back balanced. It balanced what had happened in the book without becoming mawkish, and it, again, resonated to the start of the series. It worked both ways–and that was what I needed it to do.

So for me that’s what ending a series is about. That’s how I reach the payoff: by looking for the balance. It’s not about returning to the status quo; it’s about establishing a new one. And I suspect that as a bottom line, that’s exactly what I always need and want to aim for when I’m writing a series.

D.B. Jackson: The Writing Life, part I — Say What?

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D.B. JacksonPlunder Of Souls blog tour buttonThis week, in my continuing gig as “guest” on this site, I’m supposed to write about “The Writing Life.”  First of all, it’s just weird being a guest here — I mean, this place has been my literary home for six years.  I feel a little like I went off to college and then returned home, only to find that my room was being used as a bed and breakfast.  I guess now I know how my older daughter feels . . .  (That’s a little joke.  I promise.)  But I also wonder if, after all these years, there is anything I could tell you about my writing life that you don’t already know.

And so I’m going to take this in a slightly different direction . . .

Being a writer can be a little weird.  By which I mean, that people sometimes treat writers in odd ways.  This is true no matter where one lives, but in my tiny little town it is especially so.  Examples?  Oh, yeah, I’ve got examples. (And just in case you think I’m the only one with examples, check out this article, brought to my attention by Tamsin Silver, after I wrote the first draft of this post.)

Some of these are pretty much things you’d expect.  Just yesterday, for about the one millionth time, give or take a few hundred thousand, someone I know — an acquaintance — asked if I would be willing to read her book.  I told her what I tell everyone:  I make it a policy not to read manuscripts unless I have asked for them to be sent to me, or unless the request comes from an editor/publisher asking for a blurb.  Why?  Because if I honored every one of these requests I would never have time to write my own work, or read for pleasure.  That said, I have, at this point, considered setting up my own editing/manuscript consultation service here in town.  To this woman’s credit, when I told her that I would have to say no for now, she was incredibly gracious.  And when I mentioned that I had been thinking of setting up a service, she said that she would gladly pay to have me read her book.

So why is this particular request weird?  Well, if you were to talk to a lawyer, for instance, would you ask her to draw up a will for you, gratis?  Probably not.  But people think nothing of asking writers to read their manuscripts for free.  Given the amount of time it takes to read through an unedited manuscript, that strikes me as odd.  Of course few of the folks making such requests understand exactly what it is they’re asking.

I can’t tell you how many times I have had people say to me, “You know, I’ve always thought that I have a book in me.”  Hmmm, that must be uncomfortable; you should probably see a doctor about that.  No, I’ve never actually said it, but I’ve thought it.  Really, though, I’m always amazed at the number of people who think that writing a book is a simple task that they could do themselves if only they had the time.   I would love to reply with, “Yeah, I know just what you mean.  I’ve always thought that I have a thoracic surgery in me.  I mean, I don’t want to be a doctor, or go to med school or anything like that.  But I’ve always thought that a thoracic surgery was something I could do, if only I could spare the time, you know?”

A Plunder of Souls, by D.B. JacksonOr this gem:  “I have a great idea for a book!  Really.  And I was thinking that I could give you the idea and you could write it, and then we could split the royalties.”  Yes, I have had people say this to me.  People; plural.  Okay, first of all, I have plenty of ideas on my own.  Honest.  I’ll probably die before I have time to write them all.  So, no thanks.  And if you think that coming up with an idea constitutes half the work in producing a book, you have no notion of what you’re talking about.  And finally, if your idea is anything like the others people have tried to “share” with me, it’s not nearly as good as you think it is.  Trust me on this.

“So, are you working on a book right now?”  I get that one all the time.  And I understand that it’s a nice way of opening a conversation, of expressing interest in what I do, and I really do appreciate the effort.  I can’t help thinking, though, that it’s an odd way to phrase it.  Why not just, “What are you working on right now?”  But no, it’s usually, “Are you working on a book?”  My standard answer is, “Always.”  Because that’s the truth.  I could just as easily say, “To be honest, I’m working on about four.”  Because that’s often true as well.  This year alone, I will do at least some work — revising, polishing, proofing, promoting, conceptualizing, outlining, actual writing — on no fewer than six different novels and nearly as many short stories.  That’s the only way to be successful in this business.  Writers don’t have the luxury of ever NOT writing.  So, yeah, I’m working on a book.  Right now.

I don’t mean for this to sound quite as snide as it probably sounds.  Most of the folks who ask or say these things are trying to be friendly, and are genuinely interested in learning more about the writing profession.  And for the record, I am ALWAYS happy to talk about writing in general, and to answer questions or offer advice.  It’s just when people start wanting to enlist me as their ghost writer that I begin to get a little snippy . . .

The truth is that writing is an oddity to many people.  It’s something that we are taught to do early in life — unlike, say, thoracic surgery.  As school kids, we write stories, we create characters and plots and settings.  And so the assumption that “anyone can do it” lingers in our minds, because at one point in our lives, when we weren’t really skilled at anything, all of us DID do it.  Indeed, all of the arts are like this.  As children, we all drew and painted and sculpted, we all wrote stories and poems, we all made music of one sort or another.  That’s a good thing; I think such early exposure instills in most of us an elemental appreciation for the arts.  But it also conveys the erroneous notion that these are simple endeavors that require little training and that can be mastered by anyone at all.

Writing, as I will discuss again next week, is hard.  It takes work, dedication, perseverance, patience, imagination, a certain arrogance, a bit of luck, and, yes, some talent as well.  Not everyone can do it. Which is good, because the world also needs lawyers and thoracic surgeons, not to mention teachers, scholars, chefs, janitors, police officers, fire fighters, CPAs, politicians (yes, we really do need them), train engineers, and a few gazillion other professions.  So, to those in my town, I would say, let’s make a deal.  Find a friend who will read your manuscript, write your own ideas, and trust me when I tell you that a writer is always writing, and I will leave the teaching and professional cooking and firefighting to you.  

But if there’s a thoracic surgery that you need done, and no one else is around, give me a call . . .

*****
D.B. Jackson is also David B. Coe, the award-winning author of more than a dozen fantasy novels. His first two books as D.B. Jackson, the Revolutionary War era urban fantasies, Thieftaker and Thieves’ Quarry, volumes I and II of the Thieftaker Chronicles, are both available from Tor Books in hardcover and paperback. The third volume, A Plunder of Souls, has recently been released in hardcover. The fourth Thieftaker novel, Dead Man’s Reach, is in production and will be out in the summer of 2015. D.B. lives on the Cumberland Plateau with his wife and two teenaged daughters. They’re all smarter and prettier than he is, but they keep him around because he makes a mean vegetarian fajita. When he’s not writing he likes to hike, play guitar, and stalk the perfect image with his camera.

http://www.dbjackson-author.com
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http://amazon.com/author/dbjackson

Gin and Tonic For Everyone!

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doghouse(1)Happy book birthday, L. A. Kornetsky (otherwise known as the fabulous Laura Anne Gilman!)  To celebrate, LAG is giving away a copy of DOGHOUSE to a commenter (randomly chosen by the traditional means of Oracular Cat)!  Don’t forget to say hello after you finish reading, for your shot at winning a book!

 

Tomorrow’s the day! DOGHOUSE is out for walkies, er, on the shelves! On the street! In your eager hands! (I hope).

So let me tell you a little about this series.

*Enters wayback machine*

Three years ago, the editor who had acquired the Vineart War trilogy came to me and said, (summing up) “most of your fantasy books are also mysteries. You ever think about writing a straight mystery?”

And I said… “well, actually, um…yeah.”

(I may have been doing a quiet, hopeful chair dance on my end of the line because oh jinkies yes.)

“And could you maybe write one with a dog? And maybe a cat?”

The chair dance stopped in shock. “You want me to write you a cozy mystery?”

My editor shuffled her feet, and said “um yeah?”

I thought about it for a little bit. I thought about how that could work, while still playing it straight.

And I said “all right then, there’s a challenge. I like challenges…. ”

And that’s how I sat down to write the Gin & Tonic Series.

“Wait, wait,” people said – and still say. “You’re writing a cozy mystery? Isn’t that…sweet little old ladies and teapots and bloodless murders offscreen in small towns? YOU?”

It’s nice to know my reputation for dark and snark is so widespread. :-)

And, yes, sometimes cozy mysteries are about that. But not all the time. Sometimes it’s about young urban professionals using tech and drinking martinis while they solve crime in big cities. In this instance, Seattle. With the extremely opinionated, and useful, assistance of a shar-pei rescue puppy, and a regal bar cat.

(No, the animals don’t talk to humans, although the humans talk an awful lot to the animals. As one does.)

The thing people forget or misunderstand about cozy mysteries is that it needn’t be twee, and it’s not always bloodless. It’s about amateurs solving crimes – and often running afoul of the professionals while they do it.

And sometimes bad things happen to people, and solving the crime doesn’t always make it all better. Just safer.

In the case of GIN & TONIC INVESTIGATIONS, Ginny Mallard is a private concierge, solving peoples’ problems for money. Theodore (Teddy) Tonica is a bartender, used to listening to people pour out their woes, and giving advice. They never intended to get into the sideline of solving crime, but people in trouble keep finding them….

The first book was COLLARED. The second was FIXED. The third, out this week, is DOGHOUSE. And this time it’s one of their own, the cook at the bar Teddy manages, who needs their help. His friend’s being evicted, accused of a crime he swears he didn’t commit. The problem is, the only witness to what did (or didn’t) happen… is a puppy named Parsifal.

What happens? Well, you can buy the book tomorrow, and find out…

 

Laura Anne GilmanL.A. Kornetsky is the mystery-writing pen name of Laura Anne Gilman. In addition to the Gin & Tonic mystery series (Collared, Fixed and Doghouse), she is also the author of the popular Cosa Nostradamus novels, and the Nebula award-nominated Vineart War trilogy, plus many short stories and novellas. Her next fantasy novel, Silver on the Road, will be released by Simon & Schuster in 2015.
Learn more at www.lauraanegilman.net or follow her on Twitter: @LAGilman

Joshua Palmatier — Plot: Losing Control

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SHATTERING THE LEY:  Plot:  Losing Control

Welcome to my third guest post about my new novel, SHATTERING THE LEY (in stores now)!  Again, thanks to Magical Words for inviting me.

ShatteringtheLeyCoverAs you may have read in my previous post about character, I’m an organic writer, sometimes also called a pantser.  What this means is that I don’t have much of a plan when I sit down to write my novels.  Usually I have a few “guideposts”—basically a couple of plot elements that I think are going to happen (usually something about halfway through and something at the end).  But when I sit down to write, I let the characters take control.  Most of the time, the characters end up in situations close to those initial guideposts.  But sometimes . . . not so much.

That “not so much” happened with SHATTERING THE LEY.  Almost as soon as I sat down to write the book, I lost complete control of the plot.  To the point where I almost literally had NO CLUE what was going to happen next.  I remember stressing out about halfway through, when I really and truly lost control.  I’d sit back at my writing desk and worry that the book had gone wild, that the plot threads (and by this time I had SO MANY PLOT THREADS) wouldn’t coalesce into a meaningful plot or come together in the end into something realistic or manageable.  That total sense of loss of control was frightening.  But at this point, I’ve finished enough novels and written so many stories that I had the confidence to trust my hind brain.  I decided that my subconscious knew what it was doing and I just plowed ahead, letting the characters do what they wanted.

And then the magical happened.  About three quarters of the way through the book, with the plot threads seemingly everywhere, diverging even further by the moment . . . they suddenly began to weave together.  A few chapters later, I realized where each thread was headed, and where the book was going to end, and why all of these things that I’d written—but had no clue why—were important.  I literally SHIVERED when I realized what the ending of the book would be.  Not what I had originally imagined; only tangentially close to that perceived ending when I sat down to write that first word.  I was stunned.  I’m still stunned, and shiver a little bit every time I think about where the book ended up.

But that’s the thrill of writing for me.  I’m an organic writer because I want to enjoy the experience as much as the reader does, discovering the story as it develops.  And when the story can reach out and grab me as much as SHATTERING THE LEY did . . . those are the moments that a writer lives for.  I’ve only lost TOTAL control of a book once before, with THE VACANT THRONE, and that one surprised me as much as this one.  I hope that SHATTERING THE LEY surprises you as much as it surprised me.

BenTateAuthor Bio:  Joshua Palmatier is a fantasy writer with a PhD in mathematics.  His upcoming novel SHATTERING THE LEY (July 2014, DAW) is the first book in a new series, set in the same world as his “Throne of Amenkor” series.  He is also the founder of the new small press Zombies Need Brains LLC, which will focus on producing quality science-fiction and fantasy themed anthologies.  It’s first anthology release will be CLOCKWORK UNIVERSE: STEAMPUNK vs ALIENS, currently in the production phase, to be released sometime before July 2014.  Joshua has also published numerous short stories in various anthology.  Find out more at www.joshuapalmatier.com and www.benjamintate.com.

Social Media Info:
Joshua Palmatier:  www.joshuapalmatier.com
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/joshuabpalmatier
Twitter:  @bentateauthor
Zombies Need Brains:  www.zombiesneedbrains.com
Online Store:  https://squareup.com/market/zombies-need-brains-llc
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/zombiesneedbrainsllc
Twitter:  @ZNBLLC

Jennifer Estep — A New Book Is Born

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Hello! So today, I’m excited to talk about Poison Promise, the 11th book in my Elemental Assassin urban fantasy series that comes out on Tuesday, July 22.

Poison PromiseI’m always a little nervous on release day. I’ve spent months working on a book, and it is finally out there for folks to read. As a writer, you always want people to enjoy your books, and you are always striving to write the absolute best story that you can with every single book you produce. So I want all my hard work to pay off for a fun, entertaining read for folks.

But writing a series can be a little tricky. You want to give fans of the series what they’ve come to expect. In the case of my Elemental Assassin series, that would be lots of time spent with Gin, Finn, and the other characters, some deliciously evil bad guys, and action-packed fight scenes. But you also want to give readers new things to look forward to as well, like new characters to cheer for and new places to visit in Ashland. It can be a tough balancing act.

But my hope is always this—that folks enjoy the new book even more than they have the previous ones in the series.

Here is the Poison Promise description:

I specialize in making death wishes come true.

Pop quiz. Which do you think is deadlier: Burn, the nastiest drug ever to hit the mean streets of Ashland, or me, Gin Blanco, the assassin known as the Spider? Answer: Me—because I don’t kill you slowly.

Normally, drug dealers aren’t my department. But I’m turning up the heat on some relentless Burn-pushing thugs who won’t leave my friends alone. Pushers who have my cop sister beside herself with rage, so I’m stepping up to keep her from doing something stupid and getting herself killed. Once I’m in, I’m in, and these folks have picked their poison: the Spider’s venom. But even bad guys have their good days, and sometimes even my Ice and Stone magic isn’t enough. For behind the drug is a vicious vampire with a scientific eye for results. And behind him… trouble like I haven’t seen since I took down my legendary nemesis, Mab Monroe.

You can read the first chapter of Poison Promise here. The book is available in print, e-book, and audiobook formats at all the usual online retailers.

I hope that everyone has as much fun reading about Gin’s latest adventure as I did writing it. Happy reading!

JENNIFER’S SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:
Website: http://www.jenniferestep.com/
Blog: http://www.jenniferestep.com/blog/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/JenniferEstepAuthor?fref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Jennifer_Estep  (@Jennifer_Estep)
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/580315.Jennifer_Estep

JENNIFER’S BIO:

Jennifer Estep is a New York Times bestselling author, prowling the streets of her imagination in search of her next fantasy idea. Jennifer writes the Elemental Assassin urban fantasy series for Pocket Books. She is also the author of the Mythos Academy young adult urban fantasy series for Kensington and the Bigtime paranormal romance series.

Poison Promise, the 11th book in the Elemental Assassin series, will be published on July 22. Black Widow, the 12th book, will be released on Nov. 25.

 

For more on Jennifer and her books, visit her website at www.jenniferestep.com. You can also follow Jennifer on Facebook, Goodreads, and Twitter – @Jennifer_Estep.